Past Perfect Tense: Learn English Grammar

Past Perfect

This article looks at how and when we use the past perfect tense. To form the past perfect we use HAD and the PAST PARTICIPLE.

We use it to describe something that started in the past and happened before another time (also in the past).

For example, ‘They had never been to Italy before. They went for the first time last year.’

How do we form the past perfect?

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FOR, SINCE, AGO: Learn English Grammar

For, since, ago

For, since, ago can be confusing for many learners of English. This article looks at when we use them.

We use since to talk about a time in the past when we started doing something or something started happening.

We use the present perfect or present perfect continuous to show something that started in the past but is still happening or important to the present.

Since + a point of time in the past

I have been living in England since 2008.

I have lived in this house since May.

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Future Tense with Will: Learn English Grammar

Future tense with will

There are several ways of talking about the future in English.  In many situations we use the present tenses: present simple and present continuous. This post looks at how we use the future tense with will.

At the end, for more advanced learners, we also look at future perfect tenses.

Also, practice your listening skills by listening to a music video with lyrics (link below)

WILL

I will

You will

He/she/it will

We/they/you will

 

WILL + negative

I will not                         I won’t

You will not                   you won’t

He/she/it will not         he/she/it won’t

They/we will not           They/we won’t

We use will to say what we think is going to happen (predictions).

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Present tense for the future: Learn English Grammar

 Present tense for the future

There are several ways of talking about the future in English.   One way is to use ‘will’.  However, this article shows how we use the present tense for the future.  First we shall look at how we form the present tenses.

The present tenses in English are the present continuous:

I am doing

You are doing

He/she/it is doing

We/they/you are doing

 

And the present simple:

I work

You work

He/she/it works

We/you/they work

Present continuous

We use the present continuous for things we have decided to do in the future and for things we have arranged to do in the future. Continue reading Present tense for the future: Learn English Grammar

Questions with DO: Learn English Grammar

Questions with do

In this article we look at two ways of asking questions with do.  They are sometimes called ‘Yes’ or ‘No’ questions.   We use the present tense when using the auxiliary verb ‘do’.  We can use do to ask questions about the present and the past.  However, the main verb in the sentence is always in the present tense except when using ‘did’ as a question tag. See below:

Examples of using ‘do’

Present tense

The first puts ‘do’ at the beginning of the sentence, for example:

Do you like sports?

and the second put ‘do’ at the end of the sentence, for example:

You like sports, don’t you?

Past tense

Did you like the film? (‘like’ is in the present tense here)

You liked the film, didn’t you? (‘like is in the past tense here)

 

Forming questions with do in the present:

Do/does     +   subject  +  infinitive

Do                   I                    want               to go for a walk?

Do                   you               like                  pizza?

Does               she               swim               much?

Does               your car        go                   fast?

Do                   they              play                 tennis?

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Using make. Learn English vocabulary

This post talks about using make. There are lots of expressions that we use to show things we can make. Here are some of the most common ones.  Can you make time to make some notes on these?

Make dinner/breakfast/lunch/tea/coffee = prepare a meal or a hot drink

‘Are you hungry? Shall we make dinner now?’

 

Make arrangements (often with for or to) = to plan something

‘Tom and Tina are making arrangements for their wedding. They’re getting married next June.’

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Monkey idioms

Monkey idioms

There are lots of idioms and slang expressions about monkeys. Unfortunately most have negative meanings. Perhaps the monkey is not a very popular animal! All of the expressions are informal. The idioms with ‘slang’ next to them are very informal and usually only used with close friends.

Monkey around (This is used as a phrasal verb)

= to be silly & waste time.

‘Stop monkeying around we need to finish cleaning the house in time for the party.’

‘Every time he goes to the toy shop he monkeys around, playing with all the toys and riding the scooters. And his children are just as bad!’

Monkey around Monkey idioms

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14 Cat Idioms & sayings: Intermediate-advanced level

Idioms are a part of everyday language: Here are 14 cat idioms and sayings!

Fight like cat and dog

 = Argue aggressively

‘The two brothers fought like cat and dog when they were small. Now they are the best of friends.’

Grinning like a Cheshire cat

= Smiling a really wide smile like the Cheshire cat from the book Alice in Wonderland.

‘Have you had some good news. You’re grinning like a Cheshire cat!’

alice in wonderland theme elements

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