Tag Archives: vocabulary

Advanced English expressions with get: Learn English grammar and vocabulary

Advanced English Expressions with GET

 

Get is one of the most used verbs in the English language.  Therefore it is not surprise that there are many phrasal verbs and expressions containing it. This post is for upper-intermediate and advanced students and it looks at advanced English expressions with ‘get’.

Get hold/ahold of (idiom) = reach someone by telephone/message/text etc

‘I couldn’t get ahold of Tom so I couldn’t ask him to join us tonight.’

 

Get a feel for something = begin to understand how to do something or use something

‘When you learn to drive you have to get a feel for using the gears and pedals.  After a while, you do it all automatically.’

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Learn English Grammar: Phrasal verbs with ‘get’

Phrasal verbs with GET

 This post looks at some of the most common phrasal verbs with ‘get’.   A phrasal verb is a phrase that contains a verb + preposition or adverb or preposition and adverb.

Phrasal verbs are used a lot in English and therefore they can be very difficult for learners.  Many phrasal verbs usually have a formal equivalent, for example:

After the thief got off the bus he ran towards the town centre.

After the thief alighted from the bus he ran towards the town centre. (formal use)

Phrasal verbs are also difficult for learners because many have more than one meaning.

Finally, you can test yourself at the end of the article with the ‘phrasal verbs with get’ quick quiz.

 

Get across to make something understood

‘I have been trying to get across to our manager that many of the staff are very unhappy. He just doesn’t want to listen!’

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Comparatives and Superlatives: Learn English Grammar

Comparatives and Superlatives

In this blog post we look at how to use comparatives and superlatives to describe things and people.

Look at the following sentences:

Comparatives:

Who do you think is funnier? Pete or Sally?

I found the first book much more interesting than the second.

John is friendly but I think Jane is friendlier.

Houses in London are more expensive than anywhere else in the UK.

Superlatives:

 Julie is the oldest student in her class.

We think he is the funniest comedian we have ever seen.

Who made the most delicious cake?

Houses in London are the most expensive in the UK.

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Using make. Learn English vocabulary

This post talks about using make. There are lots of expressions that we use to show things we can make. Here are some of the most common ones.  Can you make time to make some notes on these?

Make dinner/breakfast/lunch/tea/coffee = prepare a meal or a hot drink

‘Are you hungry? Shall we make dinner now?’

 

Make arrangements (often with for or to) = to plan something

‘Tom and Tina are making arrangements for their wedding. They’re getting married next June.’

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